Leadership Training for Inclusive Communities

LEADERSHIP TRAINING BY BUILDING ONE AMERICA and the SUMMIT FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

January 27 through January 30, 2022, Sheraton Atlantic City Convention Center Hotel, Atlantic City, NJ

Because space is limited, interested individuals must apply to participate in this program.  The application is available online and can be accessed HERE.

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FROM DIVERSITY TO SHARED POWER

Demographic diversity has been increasing throughout American society.  While membership and even leadership in many organizations have reflected this change, power and decision-making often fail to keep up with the racial, ethnic, generational and gender make up of our communities and institutions, including labor unions, local government, and religious congregations. This failure has left us weaker and more easily undermined by those who do not share our values of inclusion and opportunity.

One reason for this persistent power gap is that we too often confuse the visual trappings of diversity with genuine equality and political and economic integration. When members of underrepresented groups secure leadership positions they frequently begin at a significant disadvantage. Generational layers of power, privilege, experience and networks of formal and informal relationships are at play in any public arena where power is wielded and important decisions get made. These dynamics are taken for granted or denied by the powerful, while often unseen or not easily understood by the powerless. We frequently find ourselves in organizations, committees, boards and leadership structures that are diverse in name and appearance, but in reality are decidedly lopsided when it comes to the exercise of power.

As Frederick Douglass famously reminded us, power never did and never will be given away by those who have it to those who don’t.

Building One America’s training does not claim to make people more powerful nor does it create diversity, but it does better equip emerging leaders from diverse and working-class backgrounds to better understand and navigate the dynamics of power and politics and to have the tools to compete effectively and further themselves and their values in the public arena. Moreover, it will help individual leaders to recognize more clearly their own potential and motivations to build a powerful and meaningful public life.

Because space is limited, interested individuals must apply to participate in this program.  The application is available online and can be accessed HERE

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Who: This training is for leaders from anywhere who want to become more effective in making a difference – including organizers, leaders and volunteers from the faith community, labor unions, electoral politics, public office holders and grassroots rank-and-file leaders. 

What: The training teaches ordinary people to unleash their capacity to impact the social, political, environmental, and economic decisions affecting their lives. The training has been designed and will be conducted by experienced organizers affiliated with Building One America and the Summit for Civil Rights. The training is unique in combining elements of leadership training developed over the past fifty years by national community organizing networks, with a contemporary analysis and strategy for developing multiracial institutional and social power to build more inclusive and equitable communities.

Topics covered include:

  • An orientation and reflection on power
  • Understanding self-interest as a way to build membership, engage allies and adversaries, and become a more focused and self-motivated leader
  • The role, value, and techniques of one-on-one organizing
  • Conducting and understanding a power analysis
  • Distinguishing the “public” from the “private” in order to build an effective public life
  • The key principles and elements of strategy and tactics and issues and action
  • Identifying and developing leaders
  • The importance of organized money
  • Principles and techniques for effective meetings
  • Personal reflection, strategic planning and developing a personal path to power

The training is not just an intellectual exercise. It challenges and helps experienced leaders and emerging leaders to identify, reflect on, and overcome internalized attitudes and beliefs that stand in the way of becoming more powerful and impactful. The goal is to produce more powerful leaders and to facilitate the expansion of more powerful and more unified multiracial coalitions and structures.

When:  The training will take place over four days starting Thursday, January 27 through Sunday January 30, 2022.

Where: Sheraton Atlantic City Convention Center Hotel, Atlantic City, NJ

Cost: Tuition plus room and board is $625 per participant for affliaites and sponsoring organizations. 

Because space is limited, interested individuals must apply to participate in this program.  The application is available online and can beaccessed HERE. 

TESTIMONIALS 

The training institute helped me become a more powerful leader, acting more strategically, efficiently, and decisively, creating greater accountability for myself and others - Eloise Henry, President, Richmond Heights (OH) City Council

 ...a very powerful training. It equipped me with the tools to reinvent myself - Rev. Rohan Hepkins, Mayor, Yeadon, PA

This is the most relevant, intense and productive conference I have ever attended - Heather Sorge, Campaign Organizer, Healthy Schools Now

Despite 40 plus years in politics, I found the 4-day training to be new, useful, and refreshing.  It was helpful in expanding my own political power and in understanding and dealing with others who are exercising theirs. Ant it led to new and significant relationships for me - Dale Miller, Member, Cuyahoga (OH) County Council

Completely caught me by surprise. I thought I knew what being a leader meant, but the training showed me parts of leadership that I knew nothing about. It really helped me with my networking skills and in my new position as President of CWRUs Black Student Union. I’m excited to see what it can do for more people in our community - Aliah Lawson Executive Chair, Black Student Union, Case Western Reserve University

Learned how our stories of powerlessness informs our own path to power. I had great moments of clarity - Ashley Bennett, Freeholder, Atlantic County

It was helpful. Extraordinarily. Thank you! - Tomea Sippio-Smith - Public Citizens for Children and Youth (PA) Education Policy Director

Training was awesome. Confirmation for me as well as new found skills – Alexis Rean-Walker, HPAE, Secretary-Treasurer

 Learned new skills for active listening and relationship development; clearer understanding of power dynamics that drive organizations and elected leaders; deeper understanding of structural causes of inequity and a path to racial integration; and practical steps to develop an inclusive and powerful network that can drive change - Tom Bullock, Member at Large, Lakewood (OH) City Council

Key learning moments were understanding my power, self interest and anger.  Thank you! – Martha Camacho-Rodriguez - Cerritos College, Trustee, Norwalk, CA

I’ve become more confident and feel that I have fully stepped into my leadership role - Safronia Perry, Executive Director, Hope Station (PA) Area Neighborhood Council

 I used to stay in the back of the room, rarely speak, and try to be invisible. The training helped me to find my voice - Darnelle Crenshaw, Student, Case Western Reserve University  

The training did a terrific job encouraging us to reflect on times when we feel powerless, and to consider how those times can help shape how we react to the world and drive us in our work. - Tim Nelson, Vice President, Braham (Minnesota) Evangelical Lutheran Church Council, Chair, Braham (Minnesota) Area Education Foundation

Thank you. The training was awesome – Taylor Picket Stokes, Rescue Mission of Trenton

The training rocked my world and gave me a new roadmap for action. Amazingly intense and perspective-shifting. Great content, compelling examples, helpful exercises and an energized group of participants. - Gary Forman, Trustee and Executive Committee Member, SOMA Action

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Event Date: 
Thursday, January 27, 2022 - 10:00am to Sunday, January 30, 2022 - 4:00pm
Event location: 
Atlantic City, NJ
Event Fee: 
Tuition is $625 per participant (including lodging and meals)

Statewide Conference on Segregation, Education & Opportunity

Join Congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman, award winning education writer and activist Jonathan Kozol, national education expert and practitioner Linda Darling Hammond, demographer and civil rights lawyer Myron Orfield (and many others) on September 24 - the anniversary of the day federal troops were deployed to integrate Little Rock High School - to address the appalling state of school segregation in NJ and what we can do about it.

64 years after the Little Rock Nine, New Jersey has the shameful distinction of being more segregated by race and class than almost any state of the former confederacy. 


Why is this? Is it accidental or coincidence? Is it by choice or just the result of a segregated residential market?

Why should we care? What's the harm? And how does it affect me, my family or my community?

What can be done?  Are there solutions?  What are they, and what can I do?   

The conference on September 24 will explore all of these questions with facts, new data, history and analysis from experts, practitioners and constituency leaders. And it will present a series of proposals for legislative action that can powerfully move us in a different direction in New Jersey.

The event will go from 10:00 to 3:00 PM. Lunch will be included. There is a fee of $75 to cover costs including meals. Discounts are available for members of affiliated organizations, sponsors and students.

Racial segregation in schools is a structure and a system made by people that can be dismantled by people.  It is more than just residential segregation and it dmages more than just those who are segregated. It has devastating consequences for the segregated, but it harms us all in a myriad of profound ways, politically, economically and morally. 

Friday, September 24 at 10:00 am to 3:00 pm. The Conference Center at Mercer - Mercer County Community College - 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor, NJ 08550  


Pre-register here for this live gathering of faith, community, political & policy leaders.

 

Registration for the day long conference is $75.00. Discounts are available for affiliated organizations and members. Go here to see discount codes. 

 

   

Statewide Conference on Segregation, Education & Opportunity

Join Congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman, award winning education writer and activist Jonathan Kozol, national education expert and practitioner Linda Darling Hammond, demographer and civil rights lawyer Myron Orfield (and many others) on September 24 - the anniversary of the day federal troops were deployed to integrate Little Rock High School - to address the appalling state of school segregation in NJ and what we can do about it.

64 years after the Little Rock Nine, New Jersey has the shameful distinction of being more segregated by race and class than almost any state of the former confederacy. 


Why is this? Is it accidental or coincidence? Is it by choice or just the result of a segregated residential market?

Why should we care? What's the harm? And how does it affect me, my family or my community?

What can be done?  Are there solutions?  What are they, and what can I do?   

The conference on September 24 will explore all of these questions with facts, new data, history and analysis from experts, practitioners and constituency leaders. And it will present a series of proposals for legislative action that can powerfully move us in a different direction in New Jersey.

The event will go from 10:00 to 3:00 PM. Lunch will be included. There is a fee of $75 to cover costs including meals. Discounts are available for members of affiliated organizations, sponsors and students.

Racial segregation in schools is a structure and a system made by people that can be dismantled by people.  It is more than just residential segregation and it dmages more than just those who are segregated. It has devastating consequences for the segregated, but it harms us all in a myriad of profound ways, politically, economically and morally. 

Friday, September 24 at 10:00 am to 3:00 pm. The Conference Center at Mercer - Mercer County Community College - 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor, NJ 08550  


Pre-register here for this live gathering of faith, community, political & policy leaders.

 

Registration for the day long conference is $75.00. Discounts are available for affiliated organizations and members. Go here to see discount codes. 

 

   

July 13 Clergy, Faith & Community Leaders Gathering

School Segregation, Education & Opportunity in New Jersey.

Please join us for the next gathering of community and faith leaders on Tuesday, July 13th for an update and next steps on the fight against school segregation and secession in our state.

Please pre-register here for this virtual gathering of faith and community leaders.

This week marks the 116th anniversary of the founding of the Niagara Movement, the forerunner to the NAACP, where W. E. B. Dubois, William M. Trotter and other powerful Black leaders signed a Declaration of Principles condemning the “Color-Line” in American society in our courts, schools, jobs, neighborhoods, and politics. These systems of heavily enforced discrimination, it said, are “relics of that unreasoning human savagery of which the world is and ought to be thoroughly ashamed.” 

On Tuesday we will honor those powerful women and men who waged war against the “Color-Line” throughout the 19th and 20th centuries as we seek to smite it down every time it rears its hideously ugly segregationist head in the 21st century.

We will provide an update on the progress we made in exposing, challenging and purging the segregationist and secessionist provisions embedded in the school consolidation bill sponsored by Senate President Sweeney and recently passed by the New Jersey Legislature. Likewise, we will provide an update on details and registration information for the New Jersey conference on School Segregation and Opportunity  to be held this September 24th at Mercer County College on the Anniversary of the Little Rock 9.

Tuesday, July 13 at 1:00 to 2:00 pm. Please pre-register here for this virtual gathering of faith and community leaders

 

 

June 15 Follow-Up Clergy, Faith & Community Leaders Gathering

School Segregation, Education & Opportunity in New Jersey.

Last month nearly 100 faith and community leaders gathered with key legislative allies, including the leadership of the powerful NJ Legislative Black Caucus, to address the worsening crisis caused by the enduring sin of racial segregation in our public schools.

In addition to Assemblyman Benjie E. Wimberly, Assemblywoman Mila Jasey and Legislative Black Caucus Chair Assemblywoman Shavonda E. Sumter, we were joined by renowned civil rights scholars and lawyers including John C. Brittain at UDC School of Law in Washington, DC,  Leslie Wilson of Montclair State University and Myron Orfield, Professor of Law at the University of Minnesota.

Meeting organizers Rev. Willie Francois of Mount Zion Baptist Church in Pleasantville and Rev. Kenneth Clayton, Pastor of St. Luke Baptist Church in Paterson provided background on the recent wave of racialized school secessions across the state where majority white school districts seek to sever their send-receive relationships with majority black and brown school districts in clear violation of the New Jersey constitution outlawing racially segregated education. In the meantime, the same cabal of highly paid consultants and lawyers representing the seceding districts have bragged that a new bill they claimed to help write for  school consolidation can be used to subsidize and accelerate segregation (“withdrawals”) in the name of efficiency and cost savings.

Legislative leaders were asked and agreed to hold hearings on this issue including the current legislation now before the General Assembly.

On Tuesday, June 15 we will reconvene for an update on our progress to stop this new and expanding form of school Jim Crow and to advance strategies and policies to maximize access to opportunity for all children and communities across the state.

Tuesday, June 15 at 1:00 to 2:00 pm. Please pre-register here for this virtual gathering of faith leaders

 

From Brown to Plessy - May 18 Clergy Gathering

An Important Conversation about the State of School Segregation, Education & Opportunity in New Jersey.

 With Assemblyman Benjie E. Wimberly and Legislative Black Caucus Chair Assemblywoman Shavonda E. Sumter.

Also John C. Brittain, Civil Rights Law Professor at UDC School of Law in Washington, DC and Leslie Wilson, Montclair State University, Associate Dean, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, American History and African American studies and Myron Orfield, Professor of Law, University of Minnesota and Director of the Institute for Metropolitan Opportunity.

Hosted by Rev. Willie D. Francois of Mount Zion Baptist Church in Pleasantville and Rev. Kenneth Darryl Ray Clayton, Pastor of St. Luke Baptist Church, Paterson. 

Tuesday, May 18 at 1:00 to 2:00 pm. Please pre-register here for this virtual gathering of faith leaders

Tuesday, May 18 marks 125 years since the infamous Plessy v Ferguson decision that codified legal segregation in America. It falls only 1 day after the 67th anniversary of Brown v Board which overturned Plessy on the grounds that “separate can never be equal”.

Today in New Jersey, we are experiencing enduring and deeply unequal racial segregation in our schools too often combined with a lethal mix of economic isolation and poverty concentration.of us know the dark history of deliberate and intentional discrimination and redlining that contributed to modern Jim Crow segregation in the north. However, many are unaware of recent and ongoing efforts by individuals and institutions to deny our children a decent education by hoarding resources and opportunity through continued efforts to maintain and even expand segregation by both race and class. A situation that is only expected to get worse in the aftermath of the pandemic.

On Tuesday, May 18 we will present some of this information for you and members of the legislature so we can prayerfully consider and agree on meaningful action to combat these real time examples of institutional and systemic racism in all of our regions and across the state. Please register here for this virtual faith leaders meeting.

Star-Ledger Guest Columnist - Willie Dwayne Francois III

No time for handwashing, absolving ourselves of segregating schools | Opinion

Updated Apr 01, 2021; Posted Apr 01, 2021

Willie Dwayne Francois III, senior pastor at Mount Zion Baptist Church in Pleasantville, says we need courageous and imaginative state leaders who won't wash their hands of the responsibility to cure the shameful inequality permeating our deeply segregated public schools.

Star-Ledger Guest Columnist 

By Willie Dwayne Francois III

Holy Week occasions some concentrated time of reflection and action as large segments of the Christian world prepare to celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth — a poor Palestinian carpenter victimized by political malfeasance and a politics of self-preservation of the state and its power.

This year, April 4th is not only Easter Sunday and the last day of the Jewish Passover. It also marks the 54th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who never wavered in his intense opposition to segregation as a vile systemic sin and an assault on humanity. This Holy Week, almost 66 years after Brown v. Board of Education, New Jersey carries the distinction as the sixth most racially segregated school system in the United States in terms of the highest segregation of Black students and seventh in segregation of Latinos.

Today, in New Jersey, we need courageous and imaginative leadership at the state level, who will not wash their hands of the responsibility to cure the shameful inequality permeating our deeply segregated public schools.

Holy Week’s storied traditions and narratives include one of the most infamous acts of moral betrayal and political cowardice — one of the world’s most notorious acts of handwashing. Pontius Pilate, who was presiding over the kangaroo trial and state-sponsored death of Jesus, served at the pleasure of Emperor Tiberius as the governor of colonized Judaea. Matthew’s account of the episodic execution of Jesus depicts Governor Pilate, in a cowardly gesture to the crowd, washing his hands with water, absolving himself, and sentencing Jesus to capital punishment.

This is no time for Governor Murphy to wash his hands of the responsibility to end school segregation— a priority thrust upon him when more than 90% of the Black vote delivered him a win in 2017. Each time New Jersey students enter segregated classrooms or log into segregated Zoom sessions, it eviscerates public trust in the Murphy administration’s commitment to racial equity and economic justice.

School segregation inscribes the stigma of shame and inferiority on the psyche of the children forced to live under marked powerlessness and disinvestment. There is a clear consensus among social scientists, educational experts and civil rights scholars of the high correlation between racial education segregation, concentrated poverty, poor educational outcomes and many other debilitating social and economic problems.

For years, a group of majority white school districts across New Jersey has waged efforts to terminate their send-receive relationships with majority Black and brown districts. In the past, New Jersey courts have consistently and correctly struck down these secession attempts because they would exacerbate racial segregation and, therefore, violate New Jersey’s constitution. This was the case with Englewood Cliff’s efforts to separate from Englewood and North Haledon’s attempt to secede from Manchester Regional High School.

Recently, however, a group of lawyers and consultants led by attorney Vito Gagliardi of the firm Porzio, Bromberg, and Newman has delivered a string of secessionist victories to their clients (majority white school districts), relying on a handwashing Education Commissioner and Governor. Last year, Governor Murphy’s previous Education Commissioner allowed Maywood to separate from Hackensack, a decision that contradicts the Supreme Court’s decision in Englewood Cliffs. There was neither a hearing before an Administrative Law Judge nor anyone to challenge the fallacious claims that the separation would have no racial impact.

The most egregious decision occurred in 2015 when the state-sanctioned the will of Merchantville to sever its relationship with Pennsauken and join majority White Haddon Heights High School. For Merchantville, the Porzio firm embarked on an aggressive and expensive multiyear campaign to strand Pennsauken on the isles of segregation and isolation despite Merchantville’s best efforts in state courts.

Gagliardi promised that the separation would have no racial impact. Today we see his promises proved false. The year Pennsauken was cut loose, the 9th-grade class at Pennsauken’s high school declined from 328-272 students, and the number of White ninth graders fell from 40-24. Merchantville’s new destination, Haddon Heights, increased from 104 white students in 2015 to 149 in 2018.

Soon to be on the commissioner’s desk is Absecon’s latest petition to withdraw from Pleasantville High School. Like the other secessionist efforts, Absecon possesses a history of lobbying to end this agreement, including a rejection from the state in 1988 because withdrawing the 20 to 30 students they send to Pleasantville would result in more, not less, segregation. They are making the same argument today.

The majority white school district hopes no one cares about Pleasantville’s children, just like the Porzio team believes no one cares about Pennsauken or Hackensack’s students. They are counting on the new Acting Education Commissioner to roll over like the last one. They are banking on Gov. Murphy to pull a Pontius Pilate and wash his hands of it all.

If the state affirms Absecon’s resolve to secede, this administration only reinforces and validates school segregation. What message does it communicate to Pleasantville students I know, like Tanitra and Saul? Or students like Jose and Erin — young people matriculating into adulthood and civic life — will be forgotten by the state. There is no question that students in Absecon deserve a high-quality education. The students in Pleasantville deserve the same.

Absecon’s petition, if approved, would leave Pleasantville 100% nonwhite and completely isolated. That is not only illegal under our constitution; it is immoral and deeply corrosive to us all. Therefore, this moment requires action from state policymakers like Gov. Murphy, Senator President Stephen Sweeney, and Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin. This is no time for handwashing when the future of children’s lives and democracy are in question.

This Holy Week, the courageous, self-sacrificing examples of the revolutionary Jesus summons us to get our collective hands dirty to end social arrangements of powerlessness and to end school segregation and secessions. We start by demanding the rejection of Absecon’s petition and the many nearly identical proposals all across the state.

Willie Dwayne Francois III is the senior pastor of Mount Zion Baptist Church in Pleasantville. He is also an author, an adjunct instructor in African American Studies at the University of Houston and president of the Theological Working Group of the Black Church Center for Justice and Equality.

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March Against Secession

March for Freedom and Justice

Sunday, March 21 from Pleasantville to Absecon. 2pm.

Join us as we march for justice, freedom and dignity for our children, Sunday, March 21 at 2pm beginning at at Pleasantville High School, 701 Mill Road, Pleasantville NJ.

You can sign up here.

Here in New Jersey we have been tolerating levels of racial and economic segregation in our schools not seen since the days of Jim Crow in the South.  March 21 is the 56th anniversary of the start of Dr. King’s historic march from Selma to Montgomery to confront Alabama’s segregationist governor.

 

Segregation is harming all our children and Covid-19 has only deepened the disparities and the damage that it inflicts.  

Tragically, instead of getting better, school segregation is getting worse and is being made worse by people who wish to further segregate and isolate schools with predominantly black and brown children. Across the state there are active efforts to allow majority white, middle-class schools to secede from majority black, brown and poor districts. One of those petitions to Governor Murphy’s new

education commissioner seeks to “terminate” the send / receive relationship between the Absecon and Pleasantville school districts here in Atlantic County. This act, if approved, would increase segregation and violate our state’s constitution. And the samcabal of highly paid lawyers and consultants are using the same secessionist tactics all across the state to further isolate already poor and isolated children. On March 21 we will march to Absecon to demand a halt to secession and an end to intentional structures of racial segregation anywhere in our state.

Racial and economic segregation is not an accident nor is it a choice. It’s a result of deliberate policies and actions like these that go unnoticed and unchallenged. It’s time we confronted this glaring example of structural and systemic racism right here in our region and our state.

Please join us for this important action to challenge segregation and demand a broad and transformative solution to the problem of school segregation here and across New Jersey. Sign up here to let us know you will be there.

Liberating the world through Love, 

Willie Dwayne Francois III

Pastor. Activist. Writer.

 

LEADERSHIP TRAINING

Issues and Action and Strategic Campaigns

Training for leaders who want to wage and win campaigns that change structures of opportunity.

April 13 and April 15 (Tuesday and Thursday) 7:00  PM to 9:00 PM

Mt Zion Baptist Church, Pleasantville, 353 S New Rd, Pleasantville, NJ


Building One America and the Coalition Against Racial Exclusion will conduct a four hour training for leaders and organizers to better prepare us for the fight for our children and schools. The training will be held on two evenings for two hours each. Attendees will be asked to attend both. The training will focus on the principles, disciplines, tools of waging and winning a campaign for racial justice and economic opportunity for all.

Some of those principle, disciplines and tools will include:

  • Understanding power: In any contest people and organizations must understand both their capacity and their limits as well as the limits and capacities of their adversaries.
  • Issues and actions: Understanding the difference between a problem and an issue. Learning how to cut an issue and make it actionable. Learn how to conduct an effective action.
  • Strategic Campaign: Here we focus on issue campaigns with larger objectives involving structural social change. Strategic campaigns often have multiple objectives, targets, tactics and allies as well as strategic and organizational goals. It will be important for leaders at all levels to better understand these elements and principles of strategy.
  • Elements and purpose a power organization: Understanding the key elements of an organization that can fight and win a strategic campaign that changes structures of opportunity. We will spend some time on better preparing ourselves organizationally for a fight including the role of leadership, money, training, information, structure, allies and communication.

The training will take place over two evenings and run for two hours each evening. From 7 PM to 9 PM. There is a $25 fee to cover the costs of the training. Discounts are available for students and affiliated organizations.

  • When:  April 13 and April 15 (Tuesday and Thursday) 7:00  PM to 9:00 PM. The training will take place in two parts over two evenings and run for two hours each evening. There is a $25 fee to cover the costs of the training. Discounts are available for students and affiliated organizations. It will take place at the Mount Zion Baptist Church in Pleasantville, NJ.  Attendees are asked to attend both evenings.
  • Where:  Mt Zion Baptist Church, Pleasantville, 353 S New Rd, Pleasantville, NJ. Because space is limited, interested individuals must apply and register to participate in this program.  Go HERE to register. 

Inquire at info@buildingoneamerica.org about congregational, organizational and students or senior discounts.  


 

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